For God’s Sake, Who is Alterman?

File under: this looks awesome.

Next week’s Div School Lunch speaker will be Dan Laor, visiting professor of Israel Studies. He will share his experience as the biographer of Nathan Alterman, long recognized as the national poet of modern Israel. 

Laor teaches Modern Hebrew Literature and is the incumbent of the Jacob and Shoshana Schreiber Chair for Contemporary Jewish Culture, Tel Aviv University. Former Chairman of the Department of Hebrew Literature and Dean of the Faculty of Humanities, Laor is the author and editor of more than a dozen books, among them the prize-winning biography of S.Y. Agnon, Israel’s Nobel Prize Laureate for Literature for the year 1966.

Laor’s recent book is Nathan Alterman, A Biography  (Hebrew), published on November 2013. It has been on Israel’s best-seller list for nonfiction for over three months. 

More information on the event can be found here

sovietjewry:

Selma Hurtwitz, Who Is The Lord That I Should Listen To His Voice?

The peoples’ frustration, anguish, and disappointment are shown, as their way is blocked by the hands of the Soviet Government proclaiming, “Who is the Lord that I should listen to His voice?”. These are the words the Pharaoh said to Moses at the time of the Exodus from Egypt. 
This is a limited-edition original silkscreen print, based on a hadbakah original. (via Who is the Lord print by Selma Hurwitz)


WHOA. Rad.

sovietjewry:

Selma Hurtwitz, Who Is The Lord That I Should Listen To His Voice?

The peoples’ frustration, anguish, and disappointment are shown, as their way is blocked by the hands of the Soviet Government proclaiming, “Who is the Lord that I should listen to His voice?”. These are the words the Pharaoh said to Moses at the time of the Exodus from Egypt. 

This is a limited-edition original silkscreen print, based on a hadbakah original. (via Who is the Lord print by Selma Hurwitz)

WHOA. Rad.

All the rituals of Passover—what Amichai calls child’s play—do not necessarily communicate the notion of freedom they were devised to transmit. The play can become more uncannily precious than the ideas it is meant to put across. Better to have the smells of the seder meal filling the senses than disturbing ideas about bondage and release into the desert filling the talk; better to be a good Jew than a Jew worrying about how to be good.

Bernard Avishai on the poet Yehuda Amichai’s insight about Passover: http://nyr.kr/1hFygvD (via newyorker)

We loved reading this part of this piece. If you choose to click through, be warned that it definitely veers into political territory.